In the Beginning

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Welcome to MoodySpeaks! I will be celebrating 25 years in business in April 2013, and decided it would be great to do a blog about my journey. This blog will focus on my journey in life and how I started C.D. Moody Construction Company and reaching this 25-year milestone.

My journey started on the Southside of Chicago in 1967, at the age of 11, when I used to play with Legos and watch the high school boys catch the bus with their portable drafting tables. At that time, the only job I knew about or heard the older boys talk about was being a draftsman or being a brick layer or mason, like my friend’s dad. It wasn’t until 1970, when my family moved from Chicago, Illinois to Ann Arbor, Michigan that I ever heard of an architect.

My dad started his career at the University of Michigan, and this is when I met my first African-American architect, Mr. David Byrd. I remember my parents taking me to his office in Ann Arbor and how amazed I was at the drawing tables, drawings, models, and how intelligent Mr. Byrd sounded when he spoke about architecture and construction. Mr. Byrd’s office building was located near the train tracks, which is probably why the original office on my property is an old building near the train tracks.

After meeting with Mr. Byrd, I started taking architectural drafting classes in high school and did very well in those classes, and I decided I could be an architect and design the project, not just draw the architect’s ideas as a draftsman. I took a test my senior year and did very well and was accepted to Kent State School of Architecture in 1974. I was all set to go to Kent State to study architecture when two men in Ann Arbor, Hank Johnson and Billy Joe Evans, two Morehouse men, said to me, “Check out Morehouse.” I told them no way; however, in order to humor everyone, I sent my football films to Morehouse and head coach Michael Gray offered me a football scholarship. I was still set on not attending Morehouse and didn’t want to go to the South. Even though I had family in the South, I knew the South was not for me.

Well, in April 1974, my dad had a meeting in Atlanta, and I decided to tag along with him. He dropped me on campus at Morehouse and said he would see me later. Coach Gray met me and had one of the football players take me to Spelman at lunch time. Needless to say, Coach Gray was a smart man, and I signed my letter of intent right on the spot. I never saw the equipment or anything to do with football. I saw all the beautiful women of the AUC, and since Morehouse had a dual degree program with Georgia Tech, I decided to come to Morehouse to pursue my dream of becoming an architect.

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Check back every Wednesday for more about the journey…

30 thoughts on “In the Beginning

  1. Dave, I know that I am going to thoroughly enjoy reading this blog of yours! I am already looking forward to next week’s entry. I enjoyed meeting you during RLI and look forward to keeping in touch and keeping the friendship!!

  2. All Hail the women of the AUC, especially
    My Spelman sisters, We get it done ; )
    Looking forward to hearing more about your
    Journey after signing day, Great Job

  3. Moody, this is awesome! Hopefully you will go from blog to a book. I will be anxiously awaiting every Wednesday!

  4. Thanks, Dave, great blog. Few of us pause long enough to write our story. Yours will be an inspiration to others. Thanks for sharing and congratulations on 25 years in your business.

  5. I was just looking at some old elementary pictures you in glasses. I didn’t knowyou moved to Michigan after Kipling. I was on a project with Mr. Williams. Good journey, its amazing how influences happen.

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